×

Mitch Marsh

T20 World Cup Final: Aussies make history as Mitch Marsh destroys New Zealand

 
A moment to savour for Mitch Marsh. Picture: AFP
A moment to savour for Mitch Marsh. Picture: AFP

Mitchell Marsh and David Warner have created history for Australia, bludgeoning cricket’s sleeping giants to Twenty20 World Cup glory for the first time.

Nobody gave Australia a hope leading into the tournament with Justin Langer under intense pressure as coach and the team reeling at a lowly No.7 in the world rankings from humiliating defeats in the West Indies and Bangladesh when several stars pulled out of touring.

No one was under more heat than Warner who was axed from his IPL franchise on the eve of the World Cup, but the all-time great opener produced one of the signature performances of his career with an ice cold 53 off 38 taking the sting out of what seemed an imposing 173-run target set by New Zealand to win.

 A moment to savour for Mitch Marsh. Picture: AFP

A moment to savour for Mitch Marsh. Picture: AFP                                              

But overshadowing even Warner was perhaps Australia’s most maligned modern-day cricketer – Marsh – who made a matchwinning 77 not out off 50 balls to create a legacy on the biggest stage that can never be taken away from him.

Marsh’s 53 off 31 balls was the fastest ever half century in a World Cup final, with the six he slaughtered off New Zealand spinner Ish Sodhi off the first delivery he faced set the tone for a famous night for Australian cricket.

In the end, it was an emphatic eight-wicket hammering sealed with seven balls remaining – sparking jubilant and emotional scenes for Marsh, who has been through so much heartache during his career but was named player of the match.

When captain Aaron Finch fell for just 5 Australia was under the pump, and wondering whether they’d be left to rue a crucial dropped catch that allowed Black Caps skipper Kane Williamson to blast a memorable 85 off 48 and put a total on the board that was going to take serious chasing.

David Warner blasted a number of big sixes on his way to a half century. Picture: AFP
David Warner blasted a number of big sixes on his way to a half century. Picture: AFP

But cometh the hour cometh the man, as one of Australia’s greatest ever white ball batsman Shane Watson declaring Marsh’s dam busting knock “one of the best Twenty20 innings I’ve seen.”

Australia’s decision to move Marsh to No.3 has proven a revelation and Watson said the player of the final performance will be the making of a 30-year-old who now must be seriously considered for the Ashes as an in-form enforcer at No.6.

No one understands the public criticism Marsh has copped throughout his career more than Watson, who was a lightning rod himself during his playing days – perhaps the all-rounder’s curse.

But Marsh’s skill was laid bare in Dubai, with Glenn Maxwell (28 not out) helping ice the game with a late cameo, with a reverse sweep four to finish it.

The Marsh and Warner double act marks the first time in the history of World Cup finals that two teammates have scored 50, with their partnership worth 92 off 59 balls.

Mitch Marsh produced one of the great T20 innings. Picture: Getty Images
Mitch Marsh produced one of the great T20 innings. Picture: Getty Images

Warner — named man of the tournament for his 289 runs — was written off by critics leading into the World Cup, not least of all by his IPL franchise Sunrisers Hyderabad who refused to pick him despite his incredible record.

It left Australia’s key man with a non-existent preparation for the Cup, and he had barely faced a delivery since April.

But Warner has risen when it mattered, smashing 89 not out against the West Indies to get Australia into the knockouts, and then hitting 49 in the semi-final against Pakistan and a crucial half-century in the final to confirm his status as one of the greatest T20 batsmen of all time.

Josh Hazlewood was the best of the Aussie bowlers. Picture: AFP
Josh Hazlewood was the best of the Aussie bowlers. Picture: AFP

Given Australia’s unmatched record at 50-over World Cups, it was a mystery as to why T20 glory had eluded them ever since the format started in 2007.

But after so many disappointments, Australia crushed little brother New Zealand in a similarly dominant wipe-out to their 2015 ODI triumph over the Black Caps at the MCG.

Australia was left to worry how crucial it would prove dropping Williamson when he was just 21, with Josh Hazlewood’s rare blip on the boundary allowing the New Zealand captain to break the shackles and at the same time exposing Mitchell Starc to a painful night with the ball.

Glenn Maxwell put a tough tournament behind him, launching late to pilot the Aussies home. Picture: AFP
Glenn Maxwell put a tough tournament behind him, launching late to pilot the Aussies home. Picture: AFP

Had the catch stuck for Hazlewood in the 11th over, Starc would have had the key wicket of the final, but instead the drop went over the rope for four and 19 runs were smashed off the over to get the Black Caps back into the match after they were strangled for just 1-32 in the power play.

Starc was then pounded for five boundaries for 22 runs by Williamson in the 16th over in one of the most expensive overs in World Cup final history as the kiwi master accelerated from 15 off 16 early in his innings to post the equal highest score ever in a title decider with 85 off just 48 balls.

In the 2015 ODI World Cup final, Starc was the hero – knocking over Brendon McCullum in the first over in a match-defining moment if ever there was one.

New Zealand captain Kane Williamson’s stunning knock wasn’t enough for the Kiwis. Picture: AFP
New Zealand captain Kane Williamson’s stunning knock wasn’t enough for the Kiwis. Picture: AFP

But in last night’s big dance in Dubai, Starc was left to nurse figures of 0-60 – the second most runs conceded ever by an Australian in a T20 international.

Hazlewood was absolutely superb with the ball though, with his 3-16 cementing his position as one of the best all-format bowlers in world cricket, with the big wicket of Daryl Mitchell in the power play and then, eventually the crucial scalp of Williamson in the third last over to potentially mitigate the damage late.

Adam Zampa also enhanced his claims for player of the tournament with a tidy 1-26 once again putting the clamps on Australia’s opposition in the middle overs.

Pat Cummins (0-27) was also rock solid, but New Zealand led by a masterful knock from Williamson were able to exploit Australia’s fifth and sixth bowling option, with Glenn Maxwell taken for nine runs over from his three and Mitchell Marsh 11 from his solitary over.

Let the celebrations begin! Australia are World Cup champions. Picture: Getty
Let the celebrations begin! Australia are World Cup champions. Picture: Getty

‘AUSTRALIA HATE ME’: HOW VICIOUS BARBS BUILT T20 MONSTER

By Ben Horne

MITCHELL Marsh has revealed how the bumps and bruises of one of cricket’s most volatile careers gave him the courage to play the innings of his life for Australia in the World Cup final.

There has not been a more maligned Australian cricketer in recent memory than Marsh and the fact he made the admission two years ago that “most of Australia hate me” shows the vicious pressure he was put under to perform every time he has taken the field.

For Marsh to produce his finest ever performance – a man of the final 77 not out off 50 balls – on the biggest stage in T20 cricket illustrates the character of the man as much as his underappreciated skill.

Mitchell Marsh has endured an up-and-down relationship with Australia’s fans. Picture: Getty
Mitchell Marsh has endured an up-and-down relationship with Australia’s fans. Picture: Getty

He has now created a legacy that can never be taken away from him.

“I know it’s often spoken about, my journey and the ups and downs. But all those experiences just build resilience,” said Marsh.

“That sort of stuff has got me to the point where I was able to go out and perform in a World Cup final and I lent on all those experiences. Both amazing, playing cricket for Australia and WA, as well as the tougher experiences.

“I think I’m certainly very confident in my ability now.

“What stands out for me most is just the love in this team. I’m playing for my teammates. I’m not going out there to play for my spot, or show people or prove people wrong.

“I’m going out there to perform for my teammates.”

Crowning moment... Mitchell Marsh is front and centre of the celebrations. Picture: Getty
Crowning moment... Mitchell Marsh is front and centre of the celebrations. Picture: Getty

From Australia’s humiliating tour of West Indies and Bangladesh this year, Marsh was the one green shoot to emerge as he announced himself as the man to take on the crucial No.3 position.

It was a selection masterstroke, although even then, Marsh was controversially axed from the line-up for the group game against England – as Australia decided to gamble on what was working and choose an extra bowler in Ashton Agar instead.

The move backfired, but Marsh’s confidence and resolve did not waver, and in both the semi-final and final, his energy and brutal hitting gave Australia its mojo back and delivered the maiden World Cup triumph that eluded them in Twenty20 cricket for nearly 15 years.

As for a push now for him to break back into Australia’s Test team as a No.6 for enforcer for the Ashes?

Asked where he thinks his World Cup heroics might take him next: “Right now it’s just taking me to the rooftop bar,” said Marsh, who will play in the Ashes warm-up match but expects to start the summer in the BBL.

“This is a moment I’m going to savour and enjoy tonight.”

Marsh’s man-of-the-match display is putting him in the frame for an Ashes call-up. Picture: Getty
Marsh’s man-of-the-match display is putting him in the frame for an Ashes call-up. Picture: Getty

Nothing symbolises Marsh’s life in cricket and exactly what his World Cup heroics mean better than a run-in he once had with a surfer.

Marsh was trying to escape the torment of being overlooked for the 2019 World Cup and clear his head out past the breakers, when he was recognised by a surfer who challenged him with: “What are you doing out here, mate?”

In his usual self-deprecating style Marsh politely replied that he was new to surfing, and asked “have you got any tips for me?”

The answer: “Yeah mate, how about you catch more waves than you score runs?”

And with that the surfer paddled off.

Marsh, who in a brutal 92-run partnership with David Warner (53) bludgeoned New Zealand out of the final as Australia cruised to victory chasing 173, said he hopes he’s made his country proud – but wasn’t motivated to prove people wrong.

“Well hopefully. But I don’t go out playing cricket thinking about that sort of stuff. That comment a couple of years ago (about Australia hating me) was a bit of tongue in cheek and obviously it went a long way at the time,” Marsh said.

Marsh once said he was ‘hated by most of Australia’. Picture: Getty
Marsh once said he was ‘hated by most of Australia’. Picture: Getty

“So hopefully Australians are proud of me and proud of this amazing cricket team.

“For me to stand up in a final like that and get us over the line was just magic. As you an imagine I’m just over the moon and I’m so proud of this whole group for what we’ve just achieved.”

Those inside the Australian camp struggle to reconcile how such a genial person, could be so hated by the public.

“To be able to put up with the critics for so long when his performances haven’t been bad by any stretch of the imagination (is incredible),” said captain Aaron Finch.

“If you look at his ODI numbers, they’re very good. For him to keep coming back and keep improving when people keep doubting him shows how much of a quality person he is.”

 

Following the early departure of Finch, rather than feel pressure, Marsh slaughtered the first ball he faced for six – an emphatic statement which instantly let New Zealand know who was in command of the match.

When Marsh knows any loose shot will be cannon fodder for online trolls, his thundering six off spinner Ish Sodhi showed a special brand of fearlessness.

It was no accident.

“There has been a change in mindset, that’s for sure. (Assistant coach) Andrew McDonald had a conversation with me on a tour in New Zealand, when he talked about how you can change the game by getting on top of teams from ball one. And all the best players in the world have the ability to do that,” said Marsh.

“So I went away from that tour and worked with my batting coach to change my game, to hit more sixes from ball one, but more so just the mindset. Backing your ability against the other best players in the world and having fun.”

AS IT HAPPENED

By Michael Randall

Set 172 to win, Australia lost captain Aaron Finch for just 5 and the Kiwis thought they were in with a chance.

But a remarkable display of power hitting from David Warner and Mitch Marsh took the World Cup away from New Zealand.

Warner, cautious early, was inspired by Marsh — who clubbed a monstrous six off the first ball he faced. The opener’s 53 came off 38 balls and featured three sixes and four boundaries.

His stumps were castled by Trent Boult, but not before the pair had put on 92 between them.

Marsh, then, went on with it, pummeling every Kiwi on his way to 77 off 50 balls with 6 fours and 4 sixes — his 50 coming off a T20 World Cup Final-record 31 balls.

He had some help from Glenn Maxwell, who clearly wanted to finish it as quick as he could, crushing 28 off 18 balls with 4 fours and a six.

Australia now adds the piece of silverware to the trophy cabinet it had always coveted, but never before been able to win — the T20 World Cup.

Mitch Marsh produced and exhilarating innings to guide Australia home. Picture: AFP
Mitch Marsh produced and exhilarating innings to guide Australia home. Picture: AFP

So often a whipping boy for Aussie fans, Marsh will return a hero — especially to his teammates.

“We actually love each other … I’m so proud,” Marcus Stoinis said.

“You won’t find bigger supporters of Mitch Marsh than right here.

“We’re so happy for him.”

Trent Boult, as he has done so often before, was the only Kiwi bowler who caused any danger to the Aussies, snaring both wickets, 2-18.

The Kiwis’ innings got off to a hot start, reaching 28 without loss inside four overs — Matty Wade spilt Martin Guptill, who went on to make an uncharacteristically slow 28 off 35 balls.

Wade did snaffle Daryl Mitchell for 11 off 8 balls with a regulation one off Josh Hazlewood.

The Kiwis went 32 balls without a boundary before Kiwi captain Kane Williamson started the fireworks.

Dropped on 21 by Hazlewood, the superstar bat blazed the Aussies all over Dubai International Cricket Stadium, clubbing the fastest 50 in T20 World Cup final history on his way to 85 off 48 balls.

Top of the list of things you should not do against New Zealand: Drop Kane Wiliamson. Picture: AFP
Top of the list of things you should not do against New Zealand: Drop Kane Wiliamson. Picture: AFP

Hazlewood did fight back, snaring two wickets in the same over, including that of Williamson, but the damage had been done.

He did bowl beautifully with 3-16 off his four overs.

Williamson took a particular liking to Mitchell Starc — who produced the most expensive figures in a T20 World Cup final with 0-60 — smacking 19 and then 22 of consecutive overs from the fast bowler.

The Aussies restricted the Kiwis to 57 off the first 10, before the explosion, where they hit 115 off the last 10.

Glenn Phillips made 18 off 17, Jimmy Neesham 13* off 7 and Tim Seifert 8 off 6. Adam Zampa took 1-26 for the Aussies.

Mitch Marsh bashed a number of towering sixes on his way to a record-breaking knock. Picture: AFP
Mitch Marsh bashed a number of towering sixes on his way to a record-breaking knock. Picture: AFP

Warner gone as Marsh peels off record-breaking 50

A brilliant innings from David Warner is brought to an end by the reintroduction of Kiwi key man Trent Boult.

Boult rattled his stumps — it was probably Davey’s first false shot of the innings — but now it’s up to Mitch Marsh, with some help from Glenn Maxwell.

Marsh has hit a number of towering sixes on his way to 53 off 31 balls. His half century eclipses Kane Williamson in the Kiwis’ innings as the fastest in a T20 World Cup final.


رابط مختصر للمقال https://www.divlancer.com/go/?b=55


مقالات مختارة



التعليقات



الرجاء تسجيل الدخول لاضافة تعليق على الموضوع دخول